The Man Who Ran for God (pt. 7)

III. …But with Many Advisers They Succeed

“What was that horseshit? ‘Bad muchacho?’ Did you hear yourself out there?”

Inside the Doddville bus, Kratz leaned against a crafting table, shaking in his mauve Adidas windbreaker. With the back of a hand he knocked a squeeze-tube of adhesive paste into an unreachable crevasse under the console.

“That’s expensive,” Dodd said.

Kratz’s reddening face appeared over his shoulder from the nose up. “Why didn’t you use my cards?” he said.

Dodd’s shoulders sank. “I did use your cards.”

“Not all of them.” Continue reading “The Man Who Ran for God (pt. 7)”

The Man Who Ran for God (pt. 6)

SELAH: II

            “Get down from there, Boogie.”

Somewhere in Utah a budgie perches upon a shower curtain rod, shrouded in the vapor clouds swirling above a bathtub full of water, lavender, and sixty-eight year-old, white male flesh.

            The man in the tub repeats himself, stern and authoritative:

            “C’mon down, Boogie-Man. Sit on Pappy’s shoulder?”

            The budgie does not budge.

            “Fine. Be that way.” Continue reading “The Man Who Ran for God (pt. 6)”

The Man Who Ran for God (pt. 4)

IV. I Will Spue Thee out of My Mouth

            They met not at any Waffle House but an Arby’s where two highways crossed. Dodd went alone, driving a rental car. He put on a red baseball cap and sunglasses before he went in. Now was not a good time to stop for selfies with his fans or — worse — have the press show up again. He stuffed his hands in his pockets and kept his head down, opening the glass doors to the restaurant with a push of the shoulder.

He went inside.

            Ding, ding! Bong, bong!

Dodd yelped. This loud, incessant clanging struck up the moment his first toe touched the grimy tile. Like a dinner bell on a farm.

“Look who it is!” someone shouted. Continue reading “The Man Who Ran for God (pt. 4)”

The Man Who Ran for God (pt. 3)

SELAH: I

            In an office bigger than many men’s own homes sits a withering human being — white, male, hairless with crepe paper for skin. Fingers like rotting twigs press a button near his lap. There is a resulting buzz which summons another ancient man. They are both dressed in couture out of time — sweeping, shimmering robes.

            “Yes, Your Holiness?” says the second man, just as papery and just as bald.

            The man behind the massive cherry wood desk has a copy of The New York Times spread before him. Peering through glass lenses an inch thick he still can’t quite make heads or tails of the headline there, English not being his preferred manner of communication.

            “The Father from America,” says the Pontiff in his native Italian. “He will arrive tomorrow with more information on this non-denominational Protestant from the television.”

            “The one they call Dodd,” says the Cardinal. Continue reading “The Man Who Ran for God (pt. 3)”